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Sunday, June 11, 2017

Switzerland - Coat of Arms 1918-1926

SWITZERLAND STAMP SCENE

Examine the borders on Switzerland’s Arms issues

Many details are hidden in the borders of Switzerland’s Pro Juventute stamps from 1918 to 1926 featuring the cantonal arms. The tiny figures offer clues to Switzerland’s history and culture.

RICHARD T. HALL - LINNS STAMP NEWS

The 1918 series: the 10-centime semipostal stamp features the arms of canton Uri, with the border showing an apple with an arrow through it; the 15c, the arms  of canton Geneva, with the strings of pearls in the border representing the canton as the center of jewelry trade.

Have you ever looked closely at the Pro Juventute issues of 1918 to 1926 showing Swiss cantonal arms? Of course, you say. They show the coat of arms of each of the then 25 cantons.

But have you noticed the tiny figures to the right and left of the arms? Let’s take a look at these, because they have ties to the canton whose arms are featured.

Let’s start with the first of the series, the 1918 10-centime semipostal stamp showing the arms of canton Uri (Scott B10), one of the first three cantons of 1291. The cantonal capital of Uri is Altdorf, of William Tell fame. So what better to border the arms with than an apple with an arrow through it.

The next stamp in the series, the 1918 15c, shows the arms of canton Geneva (Scott B11), one of the cantons to join the Confederation in 1815 after the Napoleonic Wars. Geneva, the capital of the canton, is known, among other things, as a center of the jewelry trade. Strings of pearls refer to that.


The 1919 issues: shows the arms of canton Vaud (10c), and the two half-cantons of Nidwalden (7½c) and Oberwalden (15c). The borders feature bunches of grapes (Vaud), a bunch of “Morgensternen” or “Morning Stars” (Nidwalden), and halberd blades (Oberwalden)

The 1919 issues show the arms of canton Vaud (Scott B13, a 10c stamp) and the two half-cantons of Nidwalden (B12, a 7½c stamp) and Oberwalden (B14, a 15c semipostal). Canton Vaud was another of the group that joined the Confederation in 1815, while Unterwalden (the name of the full canton) is also one of the three original cantons in the Confederation.


The borders of the two half cantons refer to the struggles they faced in gaining their independence. The border of the Nidwalden stamp shows a bunch of “Morgensternen” or “Morning Stars”.

A Morning Star was a root gnarl into which iron spikes had been driven, attached to a chain, and then whirled over the head of the soldier. These were lethal weapons during close-in fighting. The Oberwalden border is composed of halberd blades, another very effective weapon at close quarters.

The border of the Vaud stamp shows bunches of grapes, referring to the vineyards on the slopes above the Lake of Geneva responsible for most of the wines of Switzerland.



The 1920 issues: the arms of cantons Schwyz (7½c stamp), Zurich (10c stamp), and Ticino (15c stamp). The borders picture a raised hand with the thumb and two fingers extended (Schwyz), gears (Zurich), and bricks (Ticino).



The 1920 issues show the arms of cantons Schwyz (Scott B15, a 7½c stamp), Zurich (B16, a 10c stamp), and Ticino (B17, a 15c stamp). Canton Schwyz is the third of the three original cantons and is the home of the field at Rutli, where the Confederates swore their allegiance to their cause by raising their hand with the thumb and two fingers extended, shown in the border of the stamp. This gesture is still used to signify a Swiss citizen’s allegiance to the Confederation.

Canton Zurich joined the Confederation in 1351 and is the commercial and financial center of Switzerland. What better way to show this than gears.

Canton Ticino is another late entry to the Confederation, having joined in 1803. The border is made up of bricks symbolizing the construction trade of many of the inhabitants.



The 1921 issue: the arms of cantons Valais (10c stamp), Bern (20c stamp), and Switzerland (40c stamp). The borders feature cherries, grapes, and plums (Valais); heads of wheat (Bern); Count Rudolf I of Hapsburg at the left and William Tell with his crossbow at the right (Switzerland).


The 1921 issue shows the arms of cantons Valais (Scott B18, a 10c stamp) and Bern (B19, a 20c stamp).

The 40c stamp of the 1921 issue features the Swiss arms (B20). The border figures of this stamp are Count Rudolf I of Hapsburg at the left and William Tell with his crossbow at the right, the two proponents in the William Tell legend.

Canton Valais is another of the group that joined the Confederation in 1815. The border of the stamp shows cherries, grapes, and plums, referring to the orchards and vineyards of the canton.

Canton Bern joined the Confederation in 1353 and is known as the bread basket of Switzerland, hence the heads of wheat in the border of the stamp.




The 1922 issue: the arms of cantons Zug (5c stamp), Fribourg (10c stamp), Luzern (20c stamp), and Switzerland (40c stamp). The borders show fish (Zug), bishop’s miters and rosaries (Fribourg), sailboats encircled by rosaries (Luzern), and Duke Leopold III of Austria at the left and Arnold von Winkelried with an armful of spears and a battle ax at the right (Switzerland).



The 1922 issue shows the arms of cantons Zug (Scott B21, a 5c stamp), Fribourg (B22, a 10c denomination), and Luzern (B23, a 20c stamp). The fourth stamp (B24), a 40c denomination, shows the Swiss arms bordered by Duke Leopold III of Austria at the left and Arnold von Winkelried with an armful of spears and a battle ax at the right.

These men represent the Battle of Sempach in 1386, an important battle for Swiss independence. Winkelried is famed for sacrificing himself by grasping as many of the Austrian spears as he could to open a gap in the battle line to allow the Confederates passage to kill the Duke.

Canton Zug joined the Confederation in 1352 and is the location of the Lake of Zug. The lake is the only place where the Zuger Rotel, a fish reknowned for its flavor, is found, hence the fish in the border of the stamp.

Canton Fribourg joined the Confederation in 1481. Its capital, the city of Fribourg, is the seat of the Bishopric of Fribourg, Lausanne, and Geneva, hence the bishop’s miters and rosaries in the border.

Confederation in 1332. On the Lake of Lucerne (officially the Lake of the Four Cantons, Vierwaldstattersee), the border of the stamp shows sailboats encircled by rosaries referring to the pleasures of life on the lake and the strong Catholic influence in the canton.





The 1923 issue: the arms of Half-Canton Basel Stadt (5c stamp), Canton Glarus (10c stamp), Canton Neuchatel (20c stamp), and Switzerland (40c stamp). The borders show crozier heads (Basel), repeating Edelweiss pattern (Glarus), watches (Neuchatel), and French Dauphin Louis XI and a Swiss soldier with many arrows piercing his body from the Battle of St. Jakob an der Birs fought in 1444 (Switzerland).

The 1923 issue shows the arms of cantons Glarus (Scott B26, a 10c stamp) and Neuchatel (B27, a 20c denomination) and of the half-canton of Basel Stadt (B25, a 5c stamp).

The Swiss arms on the high denomination 40c stamp (B28) show the French Dauphin Louis XI and a Swiss soldier with many arrows piercing his body from the Battle of St. Jakob an der Birs fought in 1444.

The battle was a terrible defeat for the Swiss because they were slain to the last man; however, the massive casualties they imposed on the French saved Zurich.

Canton Glarus joined the Confederation in 1352. The border of the stamp shows a repeating Edelweiss pattern, referring to the mountainous character of the canton and its reputation for printed fabrics.

Canton Neuchatel joined the Confederation in 1815, the final member of the group that became part of the Confederation at the end of the Napoleonic Wars. The canton is the home of the watch-making industry, hence the watches (interestingly, none showing the same time) in the border of the stamp.

The Canton of Basel joined the Confederation in 1501. Conflict between those living in the countryside and those living in the city of Basel led to a revolt in 1833, which resulted in the canton being split into two half-cantons. The half-canton of Basel Stadt encompasses the city of Basel and is the seat of the Bishopric of Basel, hence the crozier heads in the border.






The 1924 issue: the arms of cantons Appenzell (5c stamp), Solothurn (10c stamp), Schaffhausen (20c stamp), and Switzerland (30c stamp). The borders feature Swiss cow bells (Appenzell); banners and mitres (Solothurn); grapes (Schaffhausen); and two soldiers from the Burgundian Wars of 1474-77 between the forces of Charles, Duke of Burgundy, and the Swiss (Switzerland).



The 1924 issue shows the arms of cantons Solothurn (Scott B30, a 10c stamp) and Schaffhausen (B31, a 20c stamp) and of the half-canton of Appenzell Inner-Rhoden (B29, a 5c stamp) along with the arms of Switzerland (B32, a 30c stamp). The 30c stamp has the figures of two soldiers from the Burgundian Wars of 1474-1477 between the forces of Charles, Duke of Burgundy, and the Swiss.

Canton Solothurn joined the Confederation in 1491. The border of the stamp shows banners, referring to the Cathedral of St. Urs, and mitres, referring to the fact that the Bishop of Basel had his residence in Solothurn.

Canton Schaffhausen joined the Confederation in 1501. The Hallau region of the canton is famous for its wines, hence the grapes in the border.

The Canton of Appenzell joined the Confederation in 1513, but the Protestant Reformation resulted in battles between the Catholics and Protestants in the canton. In 1531, it was decided to split the canton along faith lines. Each town in the canton decided if they wanted to join the Catholic Inner-Rhoden or the Protestant Ausser-Rhoden, resulting in a patchwork of borders between the two half-cantons. The border of the Appenzell Inner-Rhoden stamp shows the famous Swiss cow bells, referring to the herds of cattle grazing on the lush pastures of the region.





The 1925 issue: the arms of cantons St. Gallen (5c stamp), the half-canton of Appenzell Ausser-Rhoden (10c), Graubunden (20c stamp), and Switzerland (30c stamp). The borders picture embroidery (St. Gallen), hand embroidery (Appenzell Ausser-Rhoden), grape leaves (Graubunden), and soldiers from the Battle of Marignano of 1515 (Switzerland).

The 1925 issue shows the arms of cantons St. Gallen (Scott B33, a 5c stamp) and Graubunden (B35, a 20c stamp) and the half-canton of Appenzell Ausser-Rhoden (B34, a 10c stamp) together with the Swiss arms (B36, a 30c stamp). The border of the latter stamp shows soldiers from the Battle of Marignano of 1515. It was this battle that led to the Swiss becoming a neutral power in the European wars of the era, when the Swiss realized that they were fighting fellow Swiss serving as mercenaries for their enemy. Canton St. Gallen joined the Confederation in 1803. The canton is famous for its embroidery, both handmade and machine made, hence the embroidery in the border of the stamp. Canton Graubunden also joined the Confederation in 1803. The border of the stamp shows grape leaves. Like Half-Canton Appenzell Inner-Rhoden, Appenzell Ausser-Rhoden was created in 1531 out of Canton Appenzell. The border of the stamp shows hand embroidery.






The 1926 issue: the arms of Canton Thurgau (5c stamp), Half-Canton Basel Landschaft (10c stamp), Canton Aargau (20c stamp), and Switzerland (30c). The borders depict branches of pear trees (Thurgau), ribbons (Basel Landschaft), carrots (Aargau), and the sculpture The Lion of Lucerne, with a sword blade protruding from his side (Switzerland).


The final stamps of the Cantonal Arms series were issued in 1926, showing the arms of cantons Thurgau (Scott B37, a 5c stamp) and Aargau (B39, a 20c stamp) and that of Half-Canton Basel Landschaft (B38, a 10c stamp), together with the Swiss arms on the high denomination (B40, a 30c stamp). The 30c stamp shows the sculpture THE LION OF LUCERNE, a sword blade protruding from his side, commemorating the Swiss Guards who were slain in the Tuileries Palace in 1792 during the French Revolution.

Canton Thurgau joined the Confederation in 1803. The border of the stamp shows branches of pear trees, referring to the large number of orchards in the area.

Canton Aargau also joined the Confederation in 1803. The border of this stamp shows carrots, referring to the agricultural products of the region.

The final stamp in the series is that of the half-canton of Basel Landschaft. As explained with the Basel Stadt stamp, the half-canton was formed in 1833 when the canton of Basel was split between the city and countryside (Landschaft). The border of the stamp shows ribbons, ribbon making being an important industry of the region.

See what you can learn by closely examining your stamps!

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Hungary - Hussars 1978



Issued on: January 1978
Perforations: 11 1/2 x 12 mm

Hussars:
Hungarian Filler 0.40 - Lancer 17th Century
Hungarian Filler 0.60 - Kuruts 1710
Hungarian Forint 1.00 - Baranya 1762
Hungarian Forint 2.00 - Palatine Officer 1809
Hungarian Forint 4.00 - Sandor 1848
Hungarian Forint 6.00 - Trumpeter, 5th Honved Regiment 1900

Malaysia - Legacy Of The Loom 2012



Date of Issued: 12 January 2012
Primary theme: Fine Arts (Textiles)
Subject: Legacy of the Loom
Width: 35.00 mm
Height: 45.00 mm
Denomination: 0.60 Malaysia Ringgit
Perforations: 14 by 14
Stamp issuing authority: POS Malaysia
Printer: Percetakan Keselamatan Nasional Sdn Bhd

Malaysia Ringgit 0.60 - Cindai
Malaysia Ringgit 0.60 - Songket
Malaysia Ringgit 0.60 - Pua Kumbu
Malaysia Ringgit 0.60 - Ci Xiu
Malaysia Ringgit 0.60 - Rangkit
Malaysia Ringgit 3.00 - Legacy Of The Chinese Loom
Malaysia Ringgit 5.00 - Legacy Of The Chinese Loom (Gold Dragon)

Friday, November 4, 2016

Austria - Dirndl Costumes 2016





Dirndl

Following on from last year’s Lederhosen stamp, this year we are introducing yet another special innovation in the form of the corresponding outfit for women: the world’s first embroidered silhouette stamp in the traditional form of a dirndl.

In some areas of Austria and southern Germany “dirndl” is used to designate a young girl, and it is almost certainly from this that the name for the dirndl dress was derived. Today’s dirndls often have little to do with the traditional regional costumes: short skirts, low-cut necklines, fancy lacing and bold colour combinations are not to be found in so-called historical traditional costumes. These are, rather, characterised by traditional colours and patterns specific to the region, and – at least in the case of working dress – simple cuts, as the dirndl was and still is worn as the daily working garb in many rural areas. For special occasions and public holidays there is a more elaborately designed and decorated traditional costume with embroidered ribbons and scarves, silk aprons, often full-length skirts and matching headgear, such as the golden bonnets from Upper Austria.

For a long time the dirndl was considered old-fashioned and “fusty”, but in recent years it has become increasingly common to see women and men wearing traditional costume in urban areas too. This is probably largely connected to the rising popular- ity of “Wiesen” festivals, which, taking as the basis Munich’s Oktoberfest, have become increasingly widespread throughout the world. For these it is most often the modern version of the dirndl that is worn – as sexy and eye-catching as possible.

The dirndl stamp is particularly impressive in the method of production. The Vorarl- berg company Hämmerle & Vogel, based in Lustenau and specialising in high-quality embroidery, is responsible for both the design and the manufacture. Each stamp is made from around 40 metres of thread in three colours. The embroidered silhouette, the different colours and the various stitches make the dirndl appear three-dimen- sional whilst at the same time creating a light and airy effect. You can even see the way the material drapes and folds. The dainty blouse is executed in off-white, as is the apron, using a different stitch. The red dirndl dress and the inscription “Austria”, also stitched in red, create a little red-white-red work of art. The bow on the apron and the denomination in green are particularly eye-catching.

Hämmerle & Vogel is a family run firm from Vorarlberg with a long history, that has been producing embroidery for international customers including fashion houses such as Chanel, Marc Jacobs, Victoria’s Secret and Agent Provocateur for over
100 years. A total of 5.6 million metres of thread were used to make the dirndl stamp. Hämmerle & Vogel has already made several embroidered stamps for Austrian Post, including an Edelweiss a gentian motif and a petit-point embroidery. 
Technical Details

Issue Date: 22 September 2016
Designer: Hämmerle & Vogel
Size: 32 x 50 mm
Values: EURO 6.30

Monday, September 26, 2016

Mountainous Karabkh - Traditional Costumes 2013


70 Armenian Dram - Artsakh Children In A Traditional Costume
70 Armenian Dram - Artsakh Adult In A Traditional Costume
70 Armenian Dram - Artsakh Senior In A Traditional Costume

Mountainous Karabkh - Traditional Costumes 2014



70 Armenian Dram - Artsakh Woman In A Traditional Costume
70 Armenian Dram - Artsakh Woman In An Old Costume
70 Armenian Dram - Rich Artsakh Woman In A Sheepskin Coat
70 Armenian Dram - Artsakh Woman From Shushi In A Sheepskin Coat

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Greenland - Women National Costumes 2016



Technical Details:

Issue Date: 18 January 2016
Designer: Lisbeth Karline
Printer: Lowe-Martin Group
Process: Offset
Colours: 4 Colours
Size: 28,5 x 40,00 mm

10,50 Danish Krone - North Greenland
12,00 Danish Krone - West Greenland
13,50 Danish Krone - East Greenland
48,50 Danish Krone - South Greenland

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Armenia - Traditional Costumes 2014




Date of Issue: 30 December 2014
Width: 24.0 mm
Height: 40.0 mm
Perforations: 13.5 mm x 13.5 mm
Stamp issuing authority: 'Haypost' CJSC
Printer: Cartor Security Printing

120 Armenian Dram - Yerevan
230 Armenian Dram - Gyumri

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Ethiopia - Southern Nations Nationalities and People Decorations 2014




Country: Ethiopia
Date of Issue: 27 May 2014
Width: 40.0 mm
Height: 30.0 mm
Perforations: 13mm x 13mm
Stamp issuing authority: Ethiopian Postal Service

0.15 Ethiopian Birr - Costumes from Karo
0.35 Ethiopian Birr - Costumes from Erbore
2.00 Ethiopian Birr - Costumes from Hamer
4.00 Ethiopian Birr - Costumes from Daasanach

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Jordan - Traditional Costumes 2015



Jordan Stamps
Issued on 2015

20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Wadi Rum
20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Tafilah
20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Jerash
20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Mafraq
20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Ajloun
20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Badawi
20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Salt
20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Karak
20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Ma'an
20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Um Qais
20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Madaba

20 Jordanian Piastres - Costumes from Amman

Tanzania - Traditional Costumes 2007



Date of Issue: 9 October 2007
Width: 28.0 mm
Height: 42.0 mm
Perforations: 14 mm x 14 mm
Stamp Issuing Authority: Tanzania Posts Corporation
Printer: Joh Enschedé Security Printers

400 Tanzanian Shilling - Iringa Hehe Tribesman in Traditional Outfit
600 Tanzanian Shilling - Haya Girls in Bark Cloth Outfit
700 Tanzanian Shilling - Msewe Dancers in Pemba
800 Tanzanian Shilling - Wabena Tribes in Traditional Ceremony

700 Tanzanian Shilling - Maasai Girls
700 Tanzanian Shilling - Maasai Dancing
700 Tanzanian Shilling - Singida Nyaturu Girl
700 Tanzanian Shilling - Sambaa Tribesman in Traditional Outfit
700 Tanzanian Shilling - Wabena Woman Grinding Maize Traditionally
700 Tanzanian Shilling - Waraq Man & Wife in Leather Outfit

400 Tanzanian Shilling - Wanyaturu Girls in Their Outfit

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Uganda - Local Anniversaries & Events: UPU Costumes of Uganda 2007



Country:  Uganda
Date of Issue: 7 December 2007
Subject: Pre-UPU Congress 2008 - Costumes of Uganda
Width: 29.5 mm
Height: 39.5 mm
Denomination: 1600 UGX
Perforations: 13.5 mm  x 13.5 mm
Printer: Oriental Press Bahrain


1600 Ugandan Shilling - Omwenda Costumes
1600 Ugandan Shilling - Ebibaraho Costumes
1600 Ugandan Shilling - Kikoyi Costumes
1600 Ugandan Shilling - Kanzu Costumes
1600 Ugandan Shilling - Gomesi Costumes
1600 Ugandan Shilling - Karimojong Costumes

Uganda - Cultural Dances and Dresses of East Africa 2003



Country: Uganda
Date of Issue: 16 October 2003
Primary theme: Music & Dance
Width: 28.5 mm
Height: 42.5 mm
Layout/Format sheet
Perforations: 14.2mm x 14mm
Printer: Joh Enschede Stamps

400 Ugandan Shilling - Entogoro Dances
800 Ugandan Shilling - Karimojong Dances
1400 Ugandan Shilling - A Dance from Teso

Souvenir Sheet:
1200 Ugandan Shilling - Kiga Dress
1200 Ugandan Shilling - Acholi Dress
1200 Ugandan Shilling - Karimojong Dress
1200 Ugandan Shilling - Ganda Dress

Saturday, December 29, 2012

Spain - Moda Espanola 2012




Date of Issue: 17 September 2012
Gravure printing with microrelief
Coated, gummed, phosphorescent
Teeth 13 ¼ (horizontal) and 12 ¾ (vertical)
Seal Size: 28.8 x 49.8 mm. (vertical)
Sheet size: 105.6 x 150 mm block. (vertical)
Face value of the stamps: € 0.85
Printing Run: 280,000 block

The series appears dedicated to Spanish fashion designer Pedro del Hierro, recognized both in domestic and international gateways.

SPANISH FASHION
The son of a painter, Pedro del Hierro (Madrid, 1948) shows very young artistic talents in drawing and fashion, composing highly original designs. After acquiring training and expertise in the art of fashion, in 1974 he presented his first collection. Two years later, 1976, he entered the House of Haute Couture and show their collections in New York, several countries in Latin America and Europe, where it begins to be recognized. In 1981 he opened his own shop in a department store, synchronizing with the prêt a porter and haute couture dresses creating personalities and international events. In 1987 embarks on new projects related to fashion and accessories. His reputation is on the rise and in 1990 began designing menswear.

Pedro del Hierro understands fashion "as an evolving constantly changing" and is inspired by the objects of life itself to dress with dynamism and elegance to young and old. The stamps are reproduced images, provided by Cortefiel, which appear in the catalog of the exhibition on the designer in the Costume Museum, Madrid, which preserves these unique pieces. The first of the seals has a long, asymmetrical dress made of satin iridescent raspberry color. Has ample cleavage, with the right shoulder uncovered. The decoration of glass beads are sealed with a laser. Next, a dress made of lace fabric red and ivory, with drawings of flowers and sequins of different colors. V-shaped neckline and armholes tucked.

Below, prom dress short in front and long behind, hand-pleated iridescent pink with brown wires. It consists of two parts: an inner dress with skirt flying short in front and long tail in the back, and a short dress pink overlay. Finally, silk tulle dress with a V-neck and flared skirt flying. It will open from hip to low and decorated with flowers trimmed in ecru fabric.

Friday, November 30, 2012

Canada - The Regiment 2012


About The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada
  • The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada was founded in 1862. The Regiment is still active today.
  • Over the past 150 years, tens of thousands of Canadians have served in this regiment in foreign wars, United Nations peacekeeping and stabilization missions, NATO interventions, and crises at home.
  • The Victoria Cross, the highest military honour bestowed by the Commonwealth, has been awarded to 6 members of the Regiment.
  • Over 1,000 individual operational decorations have been awarded to members of the Regiment.
  • The Regiment’s distinguishing emblem is the Red Hackle.

About The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry (Wentworth Regiment)

  • As its motto proclaims, The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry—nicknamed “the Rileys”—isSemper Paratus (Always Ready).
  • The Regiment, founded in 1862, is celebrating 150 years of service that includes wartime battle, peacekeeping and home-based relief efforts.
  • Founded as the 13th Battalion Volunteer Militia (Infantry), Canada, in 1936, it merged with the Wentworth Regiment and was named The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry (Wentworth Regiment).
  • The Victoria Cross was awarded to 2 members, and the Regiment has earned close to 40 battle honours in recognition of actions undertaken by its soldiers.

About The Royal Regiment of Canada

  • In 1861, fearing invasion from the war-torn U.S., nearly 200 men met in Toronto to raise a volunteer battalion.
  • Their efforts lead to the formation of The Royal Regiment of Canada, a regiment that would eventually win battle honours on 3 continents and earn a top-notch reputation among Canadian units.
  • The Regiment’s name changed several times until, on February 11, 1939, it became The Royal Regiment of Canada.
  • Today, members participate in peacekeeping missions around the world, most recently in Sudan and Afghanistan, and are deployed at home when needed.


Issued: October 11, 2012
The rise of American military strength during the American Civil War (1861-1865) made the governments of Upper and Lower Canada uneasy. In addition to witnessing a build up of arms among their neighbours to the south, Canadian leaders no doubt considered that if Americans were willing to wage war against their own countrymen, then they would have no qualms about attacking the nascent nation north of the 49th parallel. In response to this perceived threat, they authorized the formation of militia regiments throughout the eastern half of the country. As settlement spread west—and Confederation formed, regiments continued to spring up wherever brave Canadians saw the need to stand on guard.While the often complex and highly descriptive names of many of the regiments have changed over the decades, there are several active regiments that can trace their history prior to Confederation. This stamp issue salutes three regiments celebrating a century and a half of active duty.
Founded in 1862, The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada was presented its first colours in that same year as the 5th Battalion “The Royal Light Infantry of Montreal.” First called out for military service in the 1860s against Fenian invaders, over the past century and a half, tens of thousands of Canadians have served in Canada’s Black Watch in foreign wars, United Nations peacekeeping and stabilization missions, NATO interventions, and crises at home. Six members of the Regiment have been awarded the Victoria Cross, the highest military honour bestowed by the Commonwealth, and over one thousand individual operational decorations have been awarded to members of the Regiment. The Red Hackle, its distinguishing emblem, is worn proudly—a symbol of tradition, duty and sacrifice.
With the motto Semper Paratus (Always Ready) The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry—nicknamed “the Rileys,” is also celebrating 150 years of active duty in wartime battle, peacekeeping and home-based relief efforts. Founded in 1862, as the 13th Battalion Volunteer Militia (Infantry), Canada, in 1936, it merged with the Wentworth Regiment to become The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry (Wentworth Regiment). Two members have been awarded the Victoria Cross and the Regiment has earned close to 40 battle honours in recognition of actions undertaken by its soldiers.
In 1861, fearing invasion from a war-torn U.S., nearly 200 men met in Toronto to raise a volunteer battalion. Eventually, their efforts lead to the formation of what would become The Royal Regiment of Canada, a regiment that would eventually win battle honours on three continents and earn a top-notch reputation among Canadian units. Formed March 14, 1862, as the 10th Battalion Volunteer Militia Rifles, Canada, its members saw their first action in 1885. The Regiment’s name changed several times until February 11, 1939, finally becoming The Royal Regiment of Canada. Today, members participate in peacekeeping missions around the world, most recently in Sudan and Afghanistan, and are deployed at home when needed.
One of the challenges of approaching a century and a half of history for three distinctive organizations that had gone through many changes internally over the years—and to create a cohesive series of stamps—was in finding an element common to all three regiments throughout their history. According to David Sasha, partner at Sputnik Design.
“We set out to depict and honour the service and sacrifice of every single person who has served proudly and bravely for this great country since 1862. That wasn’t easy, since no one person, event or place can serve to represent the regiments’ long and memorable history. So we decided to focus on the aspects that are common to all parts of their history— the uniforms, the colours and the symbols that stand for these great regiments. Using the evolution of the uniform captures a moment in history and ties all the regiments together, while celebrating the differences among them. We honour each regiment individually as well as celebrate them collectively for serving Canada over the last 150 years.”
Montréal illustrator Sharif Tarabay helped to bring these stamps to life. Sasha notes, “He was perfectly suited to do these illustrations as he had previously illustrated all 100 recipients of the Canada Victoria Cross. We didn’t want the illustrations to be a photographic representation of the soldiers, but rather something that had much more depth to bring out the personality of the individual soldiers and to bring the story behind them to life. Each soldier stands at attention and encompasses the look and feel from that time period. As you look at the stamps you immediately see a reflection of 150 years of dedication and service to a country that these individuals were willing to give their life for.”
Colour, through the use of fabric, was added to the stamp booklets to distinguish the respective regiments—the unique tartan of the Black Watch; the scarlet red that is synonymous with The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and the CADPAT digital camouflage pattern for The Royal Regiment of Canada. The crests for each of these regiments is also unique and helped to distinguish each within the booklets, especially on the souvenir sheet where they sit side by side.
David Sasha explains, “We decided that the crests should also be depicted in the same manner as the soldier illustrations, and we had the illustrator render them to give complete harmony to the design. The stamps jump off the page as they are surrounded by historical images from the regiments. This continues to give more perspective on the soldiers, the battalions and the battles that were fought. These images are in muted, earthy colors to give a historical feel and to enhance the brilliance of the stamp illustrations and the regiment crests.”
This issue most certainly represents the stamp-as-storyteller approach. Sasha adds, “Our goal was to create an in-depth perspective of the past 150 years for three of Canada’s great military regiments without the need for a word of narrative—and we believe we’ve been successful.”

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Cuba - Afro-Cuban Dances 2012




Afro Cuban Dance:

Afro-Cuban dance culture has spanned across the Caribbean and African regions for centuries. It is a lively, energetic and loud form of dance which really energizes the spirit of both the dancer and the viewer. Due to their lively nature there is often a hesitation amongst non-natives to indulge in this art form. However, with a growing interest in diverse cultures across the world and an influx of Cubans and Africans into the Western world, this dance form has gained more ground and it is actually being taught in some universities and art schools.

People of Caribbean, Africa and or Latino origin are fond of their culture and indulge in these dance techniques. However, the Western world at large feels that these dances may be associated with prayer rituals from the Caribbean and African regions. This is the main reason why they hesitate in indulging in this art form. Furthermore, for people who follow a more orthodox religion it is difficult to explore and express their religious beliefs too freely in public. They prefer to keep the symbolic and religious meanings of their rituals to themselves and do not want to share them with outsiders.

History Of The Development Of Afro-Cuban Dances

When you go back to the roots of this tradition of Afro-Cuban dances you’ll be amazed that the Cubans are truly masters of this craft. They have a deep affection and warmth as persons and love music and dance. Cuba has put in a lot of effort to preserve the African influence on its culture since the Cuban revolution and Afro-Cuban dance is more folkloric than anything else. The reason why there is a strong African cultural influence in Cuba is because during the slavery era over 30 million Africans were forced to live in Cuba and serve as slaves. The majority of them came from Nigeria and were part of the Yoruba tribe which indulged in ancestral worship to ask their deceased generations for guidance and assistance. The main aim of this religious tribe was to gain spiritual strength and follow the wishes of the creator by living in accordance with the rules set out by their Creator. Their belief was that in their rhythmic energy was a reflection of spiritual power and by focusing on a particular rhythm you were able to develop a certain skill that you desire.
These traditions of religious symbolism soon merged with the Spaniards who were basically Catholics and slave drivers. The Spaniards who were devout Catholics used religion as a means to divide and rule Africans and actually offered a course of redemption to those who would like to convert to Christianity. This led to the creation of Cabildos who were converts in slavery. However, this helped the Africans to retain their traditions and follow their age-old customs under the watchful eyes of the Spaniards. Unfortunately those slaves who were sent to different parts of the Caribbean and even the United States were actually unable to hold on to the precise structure of their religious beliefs and symbolism which included prayer, chanting and dances. On Catholic holidays it was well known that a group of Cuban slaves would parade in Cuba and dance, sing and chant to the rhythm of large drums.
Eventually there was a merger of Christian and African beliefs whereby more of the Spanish belief system was incorporated into the African worship system and included special symbolic manifestations which were detected in the new belief system called Santeria. In Cuba they were open and could display the religion to anyone who was part of the Cuban culture. This religion had specific dance steps which can be learned by anyone who is not even part of the religion because the believers of this belief system feel that everyone has a rhythmic soul across the globe. The main aim of folkloric dance is to learn the different and specific steps which are associated with the tribes or belief systems prevalent for tribes of Africans who were forced to migrate to Cuba.

Saturday, October 6, 2012

Papua New Guinea - Traditional Clothes 2012



Technical Details:
Issue Date: 05 September 2012
Stamp Size: 28.45mm x 42.58mm
Denomination:  K1.20, K1.20, K6.00 & K8.00; Sheetlet; K16.40; Souvenir Sheet; K10.00
Quantity Printed: 150, 000 Stamps
Sheet Contents: 25 Stamps
Format: Vertical
Perforation: 2mm
Colours: 4 Colour Process
Paper: 102 gsm
Gum: Unwatered mark, PVA Gummed
Printing Technique: Multi Colour Offset Lithography
Designer: Billy John telek, Post PNG Philatelic Production
Printer: Southern Colour Print Ltd, NZ

TRADITIONAL CLOTHES OF PAPUA NEW GUINEA:
Papua New Guinea is known as the last frontier and is still being discovered. Despite the intrusion of the modern age, its people still practice the ways of their forefathers, in terms of active participation in their tradition and culture.  

With the introduction of Christianity, we see much of it (tradition and culture) fading away as Christian ethics and values takes over.  

The most notable is the change of traditional clothes to modern clothes. Not only that, religious ethics also demand decent dressing from faithful followers.   

Helplessly, we gradually watch our traditional clothes change hands with the modern clothes. The knowledge of methods as to how they’re made is also disappearing fast.   

As we move into the 21st century, much of today’s generation have a vague or otherwise no knowledge of how their ancestors dress.  

In the quest to continually preserve that tradition, Post PNG through the Philatelic Bureau, continue to assist by featuring some of the many Traditional Clothes of Papua New Guinea on stamps.  

Stamp Set:  
Papua New Guinean Kina 1.20 - A Man from Telefomin in Sandaun Province wearing a Traditional penis gourd.  
Papua New Guinean Kina 1.20 - A lady from Pomio in East New Britain wearing a traditional grass skirt. With the introduction of christianity, most of these dressings have faded away.
Papua New Guinean Kina 6.00 - Papuan ladies from Central province wearing their traditional grass skirts.  
Papua New Guinean Kina 8.00 - A Duna woman and her child wearing their tradional cloths. The woman wears grass skirt made from locally grown reeds. Covering her head and back is a type of traditional rain coat made from pandanus leaves stitched together. 

Souvenir Sheet:  
Papua New Guinean Kina 10.00 - Two Popondetta Widows wearing Traditional Tapa cloth (made of tree bark) during a mourning over a dead relative. 

Souvenir Sheetlet: 
Papua New Guinean Kina 1.20 - Mendi bride dressed in tree bark fibres and painted black before getting married.
Papua New Guinean Kina 1.20 - Tari lady wearing grass skirt and tree bark over her back as a protection from sun and rain. 
Papua New Guinean Kina 6.00 - A typical Trobriand family. The lady wears grass skirt while the man wears a pandanus pants. 
Papua New Guinean Kina 8.00 - Mukawa ladies from Milne Bay Province wearing grass skirts made from pandanus leaves and banana leaves.

Thursday, October 4, 2012

Ethiopia - Regional Hair Styles 1975


Issued on 15 December 1975
Regional Hair Styles:
0.05 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Illubabor
0.15 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Arussi
0.20 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Eritrea
0.30 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Bale
0.35 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Kaffa
0.50 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Begemder
0.60 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Shqa

Ethiopia - Regional Hair Styles 1977



Issued on 28 April 1977
Regional Hair Styles:
0.05 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Wollega
0.10 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Gojjam
0.15 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Tigre
0.20 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Harrar
0.25 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Gemu Gofa
0.40 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Sidamo
0.50 Ethiopian Birr - Hair Style from Wollo